Tips on Writing Goals for CrossFit Athletes

by Brad McLeod with Heather Self

As athletes – we all have goals. Some are more defined than others.  Some are bigger than others.  Some athletes have a method of reaching their goals in far faster time than others.

We overhear them at the gym all the time.  Lose 5 lbs. Compete in or first 5k. Get our first double under – or…string together 10 double unders. Achieve a 400 lb dead lift. Compete in CrossFit Regionals. Compete and win the CrossFit Games.

1. Have goals that agree with your core values.

  • If you don’t know what your core values are, or you’re not sure, write out a list of the ten most important things in your life (no specific order), then take the top five and write out what you’d like to improve about each thing, then three steps you can take that will create momentum towards them.  As you get momentum, you’ll think of more and more ways to do this.

How to Achieve your Goals – Audio inside info

Quote:
“Most people diffuse their psychic energy (attention) in hundreds of random ways. Those who flow focus their psychic energy intentionally upon the task at hand. It really boils down to knowing your goal, concentrating upon it, remaining determined and having the self-discipline to complete what you are doing.”
— Dick Sutphen

More Tips on Writing Goals for CrossFit Athletes

A video with tips on writing goals for CrossFit Athletes

2. Believe that you Can Accomplish the Goal.

If you feel resistance to it, or there’s a voice in your head saying you can’t, continue to remind yourself that was your old belief and that you can.  If you still feel resistance (or fear), spend some time with it and ask yourself why.  If you can discover what your self-talk is around your goals/beliefs, you can find out what you’re really telling yourself and start changing how you think about the goal — and yourself.  Self-talk is the biggest power behind what we create, both negative and positive results.

More Tips on Writing Goals for CrossFit Athletes

3. Write down your goal.

  • If you hit an obstacle along the way, even several, it doesn’t mean “no” or you “can’t”.  It could just mean adjustments in the methods being used/how you’re trying to create them.  Maybe some other things need to be in place/created first.  Obstacles are just life’s way of helping you refine your tactics and mission statements to yourself.  Take them as ways to grow and learn about the creativity and skills you already have in you but just haven’t discovered yet.  It’s the same thing with mistakes.  Mistakes are not failures, and even failure isn’t failure — unless you believe it is, and is a reason to stop trying for your goals.  Mistakes and failures are, as Henry Ford said, “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently.”

4. Check Your Goal Setting Milestones and Achievements Regularly

Take your 3×5 card out of your wallet and read them daily.  Read them aloud for better effect.  Visualize your dream coming true while you read them aloud for even better effect.

Question: What is a book that you recommend to help out with writing and achieving goals?

We like the book Goals!: How to Get Everything You Want — Faster Than You Ever Thought Possible. I have read this book twice now and underlined sections and dog eared pages.

A very good book for goals.

A few More Tips on Writing Goals for CrossFit Athletes

5. Take Massive Action Daily. Take notes on your daily progress.

More Tips on Writing Goals for CrossFit Athletes

6. Troubleshoot potential obstacles and get rid of them in advance.

  • If you hit an obstacle along the way, even several, it doesn’t mean “no” or you “can’t”.  It could just mean adjustments in the methods being used/how you’re trying to create them.  Maybe some other things need to be in place/created first.  Obstacles are just life’s way of helping you refine your tactics and mission statements to yourself.  Take them as ways to grow and learn about the creativity and skills you already have in you but just haven’t discovered yet.  It’s the same thing with mistakes.  Mistakes are not failures, and even failure isn’t failure — unless you believe it is, and is a reason to stop trying for your goals.  Mistakes and failures are, as Henry Ford said, “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently.”

7. Break your big goals down into smaller micro-goals.  Like doing one rep at a time versus looking at the whole workout in entirety.

Tips on Writing Goals for CrossFit Athletes

Check out 10 Tips to Breaking Through Training Plateus

8. Share your goals with a person who will keep you accountable.

Make sure NOT to share with other negative nobodies who will bring you down and squash your dream.  Only share with those that are a part of your team and will work to protect you and help you.  If you dont have someone like that then work hard to find someone.  Somewhere there are others that are doing the same — looking for another person to share their dream and to grow.  Put out signals – like a radio frequency – and you will attract others of like kind.

Mental Preparedness – How to Prepare for The STorm – Audio inside info

9. Celebrate the mini-successes along the way.

  • Also celebrate your hard work each week with a treat — even if you haven’t reached a specific goal, because just marching towards them every day with action steps is something to celebrate.
    (I add this because years ago, back when I was working on losing those 65 lbs, this was the best advice I ever came across, though it was about food and helping yourself not binge.  I allowed myself something sweet once a week and when I started doing that I started losing weight even faster).

10. Once you have reached your goal. Stop, reflect, take notes on how you you can improve on your goal setting process.

11. Stretch and reach for your next big goal.

Question: Where can I find out more info on CrossFit? Check out the CF main website here:

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Tips on Writing Goals for CrossFit Athletes

Comments

  1. Brandon says

    Writing goals is a crucial step in actually achieving them. It helps make the difference between accomplishing goals and leaving them on the pile of unfulfilled dreams. Brad’s tips are very helpful in teaching someone how to write goals down so they become powerful motivators and help one get those goals accomplished. These tips have helped me tremendously.

  2. says

    Love this time of year, reflect on the past and focus on the future.

    2014 was filled with engagement, pregnancy (in process), sky diving, new business opportunities…really lookin forward to 2015!

    May God bless you guys and keep up the awesome work!

  3. Frank says

    I have written down my goal to run my first marathon in 2015 this past weekend I registered for the Indianapolis mini on may 2nd. Training has begun and I am writing down my daily mileage. Let’s get it!

  4. Shane Anglin says

    Great idea about the note in the wallet and other visible places as a constant reminder. I have one such note on the fridge for my 12yr old son about the minimum and auto-qual #s for BUD/S PST, once he is old enough, as that’s his goal. He is a US Naval Sea Cadet and the USNSCC program has some kid-sized 2-week SEAL programs. For the 14-18 yr olds, the PST req #s are just above the minimum for actual real BUD/S draft board review, so they do not have it easy. I hear the real SEAL selection rate is higher among those cadets attending those programs.

    We will be taking a group of US Naval Sea Cadets to BattleFrog in Atlanta again this year. If you will be around there, let me know so I can shake your hand and tell you thank you for your service and also for the positive impact you have on many people now, including mine.

  5. Robert Luschenat says

    Point two of this article is about self talk. Recently I read a fantastic book by Tom Shea UNBREAKABLE. A major highlight of the book is internal dialogue.Tom wants to outline what he would want his kids to know should the unthinkable happen while on a deployment. He then asks them to do a three week physical challenge. For example you may only be able to currently do x amount of push ups etc but pick three exercises and find out your max reps in each.
    For three weeks every night before you fall asleep and as soon as you wake do that amount. Then at week two double. He then challenges them in week three to triple the original amount. The point is, when you hit a physical wall to listen very carefully to what your mind is telling you. This is your internal dialogue. Listen carefully to that voice and challenge that voice for it is yours alone.

    These are my physical goals for 2015.

    10 consecutive pull ups
    1 muscle up
    100 consecutive perfect push ups
    100 consecutive sit ups in under two minutes
    50 consecutive bar dips
    4 consecutive 8 minute miles
    22 mile 22lb. Ruck march
    Loose and keep off 25 lbs.
    Have unbreakable internal dialogue for 2015.

    Best of luck in 2015!

  6. Derek Puzzanghera says

    Hey Brad,

    My name is Derek. I need a dramatic life change and a chance/method to discover what I am really made of.
    I became a Marine in 2010 and joined the resrves, but since then I have really fallen off the beaten path with alcohol abuse and a lot of other bad decisions. I consistently feel like puddled dog shit and have no motivation with it comes to entering a gym. Commercial gyms just remind me of a convyer belt: manufacturing cheap muscle. Not my cup of tea.
    My physical fitness tests are failing and it took a me five years to pick up E-4 (average is 2-3).
    I won’t lie to myself anymore, I give up way to easy, always have. Not sure where I am going with this but I have read a lot about the Teams and I found your workout program and it gave me this sudden itch to get up off my ass. I’m 25 and not getting any younger.
    I did cross fit for three months prior to me leaving for basic training down in Parris Island and it changed my level of fitness dranatically. I guess I am just looking for my “why.” I know you can’t tell me what that and I have to figure it out for myself, but maybe you can get me started in the right direction.

    Thanks,

    Derek.

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