Gear Review: PxHero JAFO II Trauma Kit

Up for review we have an IFAK (Individual First Aid Kit) by PxHero. Overall it’s a fine kit, and great as a back-up for your car, or in your go-bag. It has some great qualities, and is much more comprehensive than other companies on the market, especially with the price point of about $70 with trauma supplies, but it comes with some caveats. Let’s get into it.

First up, the pouch, it’s got a nice Multi-Cam MOLLE capable pouch, with an internal cordage system that stops it from completely spilling out all over the ground. It comes with two books, basic first aid, and wilderness survival, so read up – but we suggest formal training somewhere – like a Dark Angel Medical Direct Action Response Course, so you know both how to use it, and how to train practically for a stressful emergency.

From a basic first aid standpoint – you are covered, and if you just need something for hiking, you can opt for the base version at about $39 and be good to go for a day hike or overnight trip. With that you get some Moleskin, EMT shears (which are capable of cutting a penny, that’s my barometer for EMT shears), a temp-Quick thermometer, tweezers, and pen light. You also will get some liquid skin, gauze rolls, butterfly bandages – all great for sealing pesky gashes and bad lacerations. Also, some fabric bandages, cohere wrap, and elastic tape.

Too close to the campfire – no problem, the basic kit comes with BurnJel, and also sunscreen, blistex, oral pain reliever, hand wipes, antibiotic ointment, eye wash, and hydrocortisone cream – allowing you to treat sunburn to toothaches to eye issues. Then to augment your adventurous attitude, you get pain meds, antihistamine, and a generic form of Maalox for stomach issues, as well as some 550 cord and a whistle. Pretty damn comprehensive for a basic $40 kit. For an extra $30 you can add on the trauma supplies.

They’ve recently swapped out from CAT-style tourniquets to the RATS , which are great for quick deployment, but dangerous for the untrained – that’s my caveat. Sometimes  the RATS tourniquet gets a side-eye from some corpsman I’ve met, because the average civilian won’t wrap it in a way to be safe for soft tissue over the long haul. That’s my one big problem with this kit. However, if you simply follow the instructions and make sure you have roughly 2″ of material occluding the artery, you’re good.  It does have CELOX – which is a great hemostatic from crustacean shells, as well as an Israeli bandage, CPR face shield, gloves, nasopharyngeal airway at 28 fr, with Surgilube on the side (I wish it was already prelubed, but you can’t win them all), as well as latex gloves.

Overall, I think the basic kit is a great value for the money of $39 or so. You get a serviceable TQ, as well as some great trauma items in addition to a “boo-boo” kit. Also, I would have liked to see some chest seals, and a pre-lubed NPA. However, I’m nitpicky now, and it’s because I went through medical training Either of these items can be added on your own for a few extra dollars.. You can decide for yourself.

Pros, what we like:

Nice pouch, basic kit is a great value and very comprehensive for day hikes, car first aid bag or a boo-boo kit.

Cons, what we don’t like:

The trauma supplies are very good for the money, but if you add a CAT/SOFT-W/SWAT-T Tourniquet and some chest seals, you’re ready for pretty much any direct action medical scenario. Other than that one caveat, this kit is good to go and a great blow out bag or car first aid kit. You can stop bleeding, administer CPR, and much more with the kit as is.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Alex Castiglione lives in Atlanta, and is an avid outdoorsman and competitive shooter.

Where-abouts include getting after it in his garage gym, practicing martial arts, hitting the trails, or running CrossFit and Strongman competitions for his non-profit, Barbells for Bullies, which holds fundraiser fitness competitions dedicated to aiding Bully breed rescues, dog rescues, or other non-profits with similar missions.

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