177 Comments

  1. Navy Seal Training / Q and A With A Navy Seal |
    June 24, 2012 @ 9:45 pm

    […] man on my left is none other then the “Quatro Duece” and the other man is The Seal Grinder PT, Brad McLeod.  Both are Navy SEALS (AKA – Bad Mo […]

    Reply

  2. Heather
    November 2, 2012 @ 2:30 pm

    #4 is a must for all boot camps (well, really, all of these are in their own way.) I knew too many people whose lives were even more miserable because they complained, they pouted, they questioned “why”, blah blah blah. And then there were the ones who were a little too “gray” and tried to scoot by with doing the barest of bare minimum, if not less. I think those guys were reamed more by the rest of us in the flight than the actual instructor.

    Reply

  3. BUD/S Warning Order for Navy SEAL Training
    September 16, 2013 @ 8:48 pm

    […] Related Articles: 10 Tips for BUDS Navy SEAL training […]

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  4. Mike Smith
    December 5, 2013 @ 1:15 am

    this is really helpful and i’m really glad you’re helping people to better themselves

    Reply

  5. Mike Smith
    December 5, 2013 @ 1:15 am

    this is really helpful and i’m really glad you’re helping people to better themselves!!

    Reply

  6. Jonathan Davis
    February 11, 2014 @ 10:57 pm

    Thanks for the help brad my question too brad was I’m almost 22 and I was wondering how do I know I’m ready to go into buds and what age is too late

    Reply

  7. How Do I Prepare for BUDS Training?
    February 12, 2014 @ 11:32 am

    […] Related Articles: Top 10 Navy SEAL BUDS Training Tips […]

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  8. Seamus
    February 15, 2014 @ 7:36 pm

    Hi brad I want to be a navy seal someday but I lack the physical strength. I’ve been trying to focus on weight gaining workouts to form some sort of a base. can u give me some tips? And a lot of people focus on the physical part of BUDs. Are there also academic parts and if you dont know that subject will they teach you before hand?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      February 18, 2014 @ 9:40 pm

      pick up a ruck sack and start to hike.
      pick up a sand bag and press overhead.
      drink milk and eat an extra portion of protein in your meal.
      study basic math and algebra.
      good luck.

      Reply

  9. Austin
    February 25, 2014 @ 1:26 pm

    In fear of failing because of the academic like testing during BUDs, what should we be studying before hand ?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      February 25, 2014 @ 1:44 pm

      Good question as there are academics and math test in BUDS. You should be studying basic math and algebra. Get a copy if a dive tables test and practice it backwards and forwards.

      Reply

      • Austin
        February 25, 2014 @ 1:46 pm

        Will do, thank you very much.

        Reply

  10. Shawn
    March 2, 2014 @ 11:14 pm

    Hey, how many bud/s classes run a year ? How hard is it to get into a class after graduation from seal prep school in Illinois ?
    Thanks

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      March 12, 2014 @ 3:11 pm

      From Atlanta SEAL motivator:
      Hello Brad,
      They are currently running 5 BUD/S Classes a year, they have run 6 BUD/S Classes a year in the past. The school in Great Lakes isn’t called SEAL Prep, its called BUD/S Prep and that runs about 8 weeks, after 8 weeks of Basic Training (Boot Camp). Next, about 95% of the candidates that go to BUD/S Prep end up graduating and going onto BUD/S in Coronado, CA.
      Hope all is well,
      Frank

      Reply

  11. Joshua
    March 6, 2014 @ 4:56 am

    Really loved the tips on training, but I am curious, I’m turning twenty five soon, and hopefully through basic not too long after. My question is, is that too late of an age to go for it? Assuming that I pass the competitive mock pst scores of course.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      March 6, 2014 @ 9:59 am

      You need to get trained up and go as soon as can

      Reply

      • Joshua
        June 23, 2014 @ 2:52 am

        So. Update on progress. I went to the office, got set up for and took my asvab. Was five points shy from qualifying and when I asked my recruiters when would it be possible to retake it, they kept trying to talk me out of it. By the end of that conversation they were getting angry that I wanted to, and called me “stubborn” for thinking I would make it for mock pst. They told me my goal was unattainable.

        Reply

        • Brad McLeod
          June 25, 2014 @ 2:02 pm

          Your goal is always obtainable. I am an average guy and everyone told me I would not make it in the SEAL program. I eventually made it and proved it to myself.

          Hit me up Joshua and I will send you a free audio and help you work forward 1% daily towards your goals.

          Reply

          • Joshua
            June 26, 2014 @ 2:42 pm

            I sent you my information in an e-mail. Looking forward to hearing from you soon.

  12. Joshua
    March 6, 2014 @ 7:40 pm

    Realistically, what should I be aiming for on my runs, pushups, pull ups, ect? Not by what the charts say, but your personal recommendation for pst scores.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      March 6, 2014 @ 9:48 pm

      PHYSICAL SCREENING TEST MINIMUM OPTIMUM
      Swim 500 yard breast or side stroke 12:30 9:00
      Push-ups 50 90
      Curl-ups 50 85
      Pull-ups 10 18
      Run 1.5 miles 10:30 09:30

      Reply

  13. BUDS and Special Forces Questions Answers
    March 9, 2014 @ 5:27 pm

    […] Related Articles: Top 10 Navy SEAL training tips […]

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  14. Brady W
    March 26, 2014 @ 8:46 pm

    I am 14 years old, and I’m looking at going towards a career in the Navy, and specifically I want to be a SEAL. I wanted to know what you think is the best way that I can begin to train and prepare.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      March 26, 2014 @ 9:07 pm

      Check out the tips above and good luck!

      Reply

  15. Mike
    March 29, 2014 @ 11:36 pm

    Thank you for the tips. As mentioned on an above post, I’m 25 years old and currently LE (SWAT). I know I’m getting close to the age cut off but how long would you say for a person in decent shape would take to be BUD/S ready assuming you dedicated 110% getting ready?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      March 30, 2014 @ 6:32 am

      At 25 you should be actively working with your SEAL motivator – moving quickly to get your package in.

      Reply

  16. Kyle B
    March 31, 2014 @ 5:51 am

    How hard is it to get a SEAL contract?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      March 31, 2014 @ 4:04 pm

      It is highly competitive and slots are being down sized after the war.

      Reply

  17. joey
    April 3, 2014 @ 9:20 pm

    Hi Brad ! you mentioned above that a good way to prep for buds is to do a lot of variations of the Murph workout. Can you please give some of the things you would manipulate such as adding new movements in or changing up the distance/reps of the things that are already in the workout . Also how many time a week should i repeat the workout. Thanks joey

    Reply

  18. Brant Williams
    April 10, 2014 @ 1:44 pm

    Hey brad was curious if you know of any SEAL mentors that could help me get a SEAL challenge contract or know anywhere I can find one at a recruiting station that I could just talk to. I live in California but I’ll go anywhere in the US to talk to them even the smaller cities to maybe have a better chance of getting a contract. But thanks again for all the updates you give on training and what not as well seriously you are the man and a great motivator!

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      April 10, 2014 @ 1:46 pm

      Good question Brant.
      Type into google search “SEAL motivator California” or whatever state and you will find a local motivator/recruiter to help you.
      Good luck

      Reply

  19. Ian
    April 11, 2014 @ 8:38 am

    When it comes to getting high numbers for the sit ups portion of the NSW pst, would you recommend training them with your feet locked by a buddy, weight, etc., or training them with your feet free?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      April 16, 2014 @ 2:34 pm

      Good question Ian –
      train with your feet locked by buddy as that is what will be in the test.
      put your feet under a bench or dumbbells if you can.
      put a sandbag on your feet also works.

      Reply

  20. Conner
    April 25, 2014 @ 1:23 pm

    Hi Brad, i’ve played water polo for about the past 8 years of my life. From everything that i’ve read online, it seems that I have a little advantage due to the workouts and exposure to water. What do you think about that? I’m planning on joining the Navy in about 2 years and will apply to become a NS. One last thing is everyone talks about the physical requirements, but what mental stage should I be in when entering BUD/s? If I go in telling myself that everything is easy and that eating an elephant takes one bite at a time?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      April 27, 2014 @ 8:53 pm

      Yes; having a strong water confidence will help. I would try to train your mental side and get pushed to the outer edge as much as possible.

      Reply

  21. Matt
    April 27, 2014 @ 8:45 pm

    I have been practicing sit ups on pavement to prepare for grinder PT and it is giving me pretty nasty pains in my tailbone. Doing 80-100 on pavement usually brings it out. This is considering that I usually do 500+ in a training session on grass or a mat and I have no issues. I’ve studied proper technique with a SEAL before, so I don’t think form is the issue. Someone mentioned to me that I have to build calluses in that area to get used to it but I’m not entirely sure. Do you have any advice for this? I can take pain, I’m just worried about a real injury.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      April 27, 2014 @ 8:57 pm

      Work your core as much as you can. The Instructors gave us a small foam pad for sit ups. But don’t rely on that and just build core and be ready for anything.

      Reply

  22. Tom
    April 29, 2014 @ 10:17 am

    Hello Operator McLeod, how was PT in BUD/S? How many sets and reps of push-ups and other exercises did you do on the grinder? Also, you didn’t do the sets straight right, the exercises were all mixed

    Reply

  23. Sam
    April 29, 2014 @ 7:29 pm

    Brad, if you had to give one bit of advice to a smaller guy when it comes to making it through SEAL training, what would it be? Also, is there anything that you would suggest doing to increase the chances of obtaining a SEAL contract? Thanks.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      April 29, 2014 @ 7:39 pm

      Being smaller can be an advantage in BUDS especially on the obstacle course. I would not worry about your size – just bring a big heart. Have great PST scores and a high ASVAB and get ready to go to BUDS.

      Reply

  24. Brenden
    May 8, 2014 @ 6:16 pm

    I’m 28 and have recently been thinking about joining the NAVY and trying for BUD/S. I read a lot of guys saying they’ve been training for a couple years or close to it, in preparation for BUD/S. I’m pretty athletic and have relatively good endurance, despite not working out regularly, and have always been quick to get in good shape, I don’t know if it’s genetic or what. My question is, is it really necessary to train for a year or a year and a half before trying for a spot in BUD/S? Obviously the more you train and prepare the greater chance of success you have in completing the course. But is that something that you feel should be the standard length of time for someone to dedicate to preparing to go to BUD/S?

    Also, with regards to training routines, would it be beneficial to start running in boots to prepare for the type of running you’ll be doing in BUD/S? What else would you recommend for preparing properly for BUD/S, in addition to running, sit-ups, push-ups, dips, squats, etc.?

    Thanks,

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      May 8, 2014 @ 8:27 pm

      You may be ready now – take the PST and see. If not then train till you ace the PST. You also want to have a 10 mile beach run completed and a 20 mile ruck. Do the daily workouts we post in the website.

      Reply

  25. Dylan Pryor
    May 11, 2014 @ 1:23 am

    Hey Brad, ive wanted to be a Navy SEAL since I was 7 and im 15 now. But I took the ishihara colorblind plate test online and couldn’t pass it. Ive tried looking into different careers but always come back to Navy SEAL. I know it sounds funny but I cant play like military games or listen to motivational music or watch military movies without getting extremely depressed. EVERYTHING reminds me of Navy SEALs bro and it sucks cause I can pass all the acedemic and physical requirements besides the colorblind one. I dont know what to do cause there is nothing else I want to do but become a Navy SEAL.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      May 11, 2014 @ 1:58 pm

      Are you talking with a SEAL motivator/recruiter now?
      Let me know how that turns out.
      Can I send you a free audio?

      Reply

      • Dylan Pryor
        May 11, 2014 @ 3:12 pm

        No I am not but my friends dad was a SEAL recruiter and was in the navy for 26 years and I talk to him every once and a while. What is the audio about?

        Reply

        • Brad McLeod
          May 13, 2014 @ 12:28 pm

          The audio is positive mental edge info to listen to on a ruck or run

          Reply

          • Dylan Pryor
            May 13, 2014 @ 2:38 pm

            Yes I would like the audio and thank you very much. And I had my mom schedule an eye doctor appointment to see how mild my color deficiency is and ill let you know how it turns out. Like I said this is all I have ever wanted to do. And thx for listening and for the help cause most other frogman ive tried to contact dont. So again thank you

          • Brad McLeod
            May 13, 2014 @ 3:43 pm

            ok; great – email me and I will send you a free audio.

          • Mike
            May 13, 2014 @ 10:31 pm

            Brad,
            Would you be able to send me the audio as well.

            Thank,
            maborrecco@gmail.com

  26. Matt Jacobs
    May 13, 2014 @ 10:17 am

    I want to be a team guy for most of the reasons that are beaten to death. I want to be a world-class warrior, I want to fight my countries enemies, I want train and I want to learn useful skills but I have a very odd motivation to make it through as well.

    a SEAL makes 50k a year which is many times more than a standard sailor. My girlfriend (best way to discribe her) is in a very toxic enviroment and i gotta get her out of there and so i gotta keep moving forward for her no matter what because if i complete BUD/S i can get her out of there and move her out to cali with me. I am NOT doing this to impress her nor any other woman for that matter. I am doing this to help her. again she is in a very toxic place and I need to get her out of there. And my attitude is that if I have to go through hell week to make sure she is taken care of – SO BE IT!

    Reply

  27. Dakota B
    May 14, 2014 @ 3:23 am

    I received a DUI around March 2013 and am looking at trying to get a seal contact around November/December 2014. What do you think my chances of getting a waiver are?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      May 16, 2014 @ 12:33 pm

      Dakota:
      good to hear from you.
      Are you talking to the local SEAL motivator/recruiter?
      type in “SEAL motivator and your area” to google search.

      Reply

  28. Branden Stetler
    May 14, 2014 @ 6:51 pm

    Hey my name is branden Stetler. I have my contract, I ship out July 28 to go to basic. My normal pst scores are about a 7:40 swim, 70 push ups, 90 sit ups, 13 pull ups and a 9:30 run. Any suggestions/tips to get more prepared? Thank you!
    Sincerely, branden Stetler

    Reply

  29. Luke Northcott
    May 19, 2014 @ 7:03 pm

    Hello SGPT readers, I replied to Coach Brad’s email asking about our personal stories and journeys, and he asked for me to post mine up here. My name is Luke and I can’t see my future as anything other than a Navy Special Warfare member. I’ve always known that I’ve had the desire to serve in one way or another, but it wasn’t until about five years ago when I started looking into specifically what I may want to do as a career, and I landed on the Navy. I want to be the best in the world at what I do, and a SEAL is best in the world at what I want to do, so choosing to pursue that path was by far the easiest decision that I have ever made. I enlisted a few months ago, and am currently in the DEP, shipping out in September. I had my Special Warfare candidate application completely filled out and I was definitely eligible in every way, except for one. Everything on the paper was filled out and approved, with the exception of the medical examiner’s signature. When the examiner was looking over my file, he congratulated me on my success in getting great numbers in all aspects of my physical, saying how I was very eligible for Spec Ops. He was about to sign the paper, but then looked at the file one more time and noticed that I have slight color blindness, so he promptly recycled my application, saying that he simply couldn’t put me in that position. I am currently enlisted with a Corpsman contract with aspirations of entering the Fleet Marine Force (FMF) in order to have the more offensive role I desire with the medical training that I want, and with the hopes of working my way up to running with the SEALs. My recruiter and I are furiously fighting to get a waiver for my vision so I can enter the Special Warfare program, which is currently being reviewed by a second party past the initial waiver screening personnel. If that fails, I have been told that I may be able to get surgery through the Navy to fix my slight color deficiency. I’m going to fight to get into that program until my age is the only thing stopping me from my goal. I have always been an athlete in some sport growing up, and I want to apply my success from those team sports to Special Warfare. I want to run with people who I know have my back, and they know I have theirs. I played baseball for nine years growing up, and always enjoyed it, but never fell in love with it. Once in high school, I didn’t play any organized sport for the first two years, only running and occasionally swimming along with strength PT on my own. It wasn’t until my Junior year that I tried playing Water Polo. To put it quite simply, I sank. I was in what I thought was good shape, and there I was, dragging my team down and struggling to breathe after a few 200 meter swim sprints. I wanted nothing more than to change that. I started my Junior year as the backup goalie for Junior Varsity, just to give you an idea of my strength and skill level. I busted my ass all year and all the next summer to catch up for the years I missed. I lost ten pounds of fat that I didn’t even know I had the first week of playing Water Polo, and gained back twenty pounds of muscle over the following season. I was humbled, and I wanted more. By the next season, I was the starting goalie for my school’s varsity team. We did much better than usual for our school, making it all the way to CCS finals, which is unusual for my school. At the end of the season, I was stunned to be awarded as the Second Team ALL- League Varsity goalie of the year, meaning that all of the coaches from the thirty or so Water Polo teams in the league got together and voted that I was the second best Varsity goalie in the league. Water Polo has taught me discipline, team building, leadership, and a hell of a lot of work. I have been itching for more since the season ended. I loved being a part of a bigger team and working my ass off to help bring my team success, even if that meant getting pelted by a water polo ball five times a day, and plenty of bloody noses. I got so used to it that I ignored the pain, and half the time didn’t realize that I was spewing blood from my face until someone told me. I always wanted to keep playing, and was pissed whenever my coach told me that I had to stop for half an hour to clean myself up because he wasn’t supposed to have me bleed in his pool. All in all, I want to find direction in my coaching again from a more experienced coach and athlete to help me achieve my goals. I PT all the time on my own, but I still want more.
    Cheers,
    Future Sailor Northcott

    Reply

    • Dylan Pryor
      May 20, 2014 @ 8:53 pm

      Thankyou for the story cause I recently found out I had a color deficency also and imhave wanted to be a SEAL since I was 7 and im 15 now. Nice to know that there couldmpossibly be a correction surgery. I hope it all works out.just remeber the only easy day was yesterday.

      Reply

      • Luke Northcott
        May 22, 2014 @ 1:48 pm

        That’s not the only option as well. The Navy states that they do not grant waivers for vision, but they sometimes do. I currently have my application for the waiver in the process of screening. It passed the initial screening and has been passed on to get a secondary opinion, so I have my fingers crossed

        Reply

        • Dylan Pryor
          June 8, 2014 @ 2:50 am

          Did you take the FALANT lantern test or any other color deficency test besides the ishihara????

          Reply

          • Brad McLeod
            June 8, 2014 @ 8:43 am

            I had my eyes checked for color blindness. A SEAL recruiter can you the latest info on what to be ready for on eye test.

  30. Eduardo
    May 19, 2014 @ 8:26 pm

    Hi Brad I hope I’m not asking for to much but I need some advice and was wondering if you could help me. I’ve always wanted to be a navy seal, I currently train with my friend Monday through Friday. We do push ups, pull ups, flutter kicks, we run, swim,etc. I try to train as hard as I can but I have a problem, I have pain amplification syndrome and patellofemoral pain syndrome I’ve had it for about 3 years now and it can be very painful running and doing air squats and stuff. I can usually tough it out for about the two or so hours we work out. But I know in bud/s we’re going to be working out a lot more. I’m 17 I graduate next year and I really want to join the navy and become a seal but I’m afraid my knee and elbow pain will cause me to fail. I was wondering if you could give me advice and guidelines or something to help me achieve my goals because I really want to be a navy seal and I’m willing to do whatever it takes, but sometimes I lose motivation or get discouraged because my knees hurt and I start running to slow or I can’t keep up with my friend when we pt. If you could please give me advice or help on what to do or something, it would mean the world to me. I have seen a doctor she told me that I shouldn’t be running on asphalt that I should run on an elliptical, stretch a lot, gets lots of sleep, and not work out to much. I run on asphalt and dirt roads. I pt for about an hour. She’s says it’s ok to run on asphalt but it’s going to hurt me she doesn’t recommend it. I go to a foot specialist to get my running shoes and I usually wear insoles in my regular shoes. I started taking fish oil and a multivitamin, and I’ve been taking glucosamine chondroitin msm to keep my joints healthy. Is there anything else you recommend for me to do or other things I could take to help keep me healthy and strong and things you don’t recommend? Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my questions, it means so much to me that there’s people like you out there helping out people like me.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      June 8, 2014 @ 8:49 am

      We don’t recommend may supplements other than protein and fish oil. Can you swim? I would spend more time in pool? Can you ruck? I would slowly build up miles on the beach, dirt road and rivers edge.
      Stay in touch and email me in a month and let me know how that works.

      Reply

  31. How Hard is it to become a Navy SEAL?
    May 22, 2014 @ 4:41 pm

    […] Check out these Top 10 Navy SEAL BUDS Training Tips HERE […]

    Reply

  32. DJO
    June 4, 2014 @ 11:05 pm

    Hey Coach,

    School is coming to a close and my athletic season just ended. For a while now, I have wanted to join the navy and become a SEAL, but although joining the SEALs is my primary focus, I just want to get into Special Forces shape. I am doing simple things such as running, body weight exercises, and eventually I will get into the pool. What would you recommend I do during the summer so that everyday I will come closer to getting in BUDS shape and increase my chances of succession, but also carry this workout mentality until I join in a couple of years?

    Thanks for the help

    Reply

  33. Tyler
    June 12, 2014 @ 1:50 pm

    Hey really liked your article. Me and my twin brother both are striving to become SEALs. Do you know if it is possible for us to go to BUD/s together?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      June 12, 2014 @ 5:42 pm

      Talk to your local SEAL recruiter and see if he can get you and your brother in to Navy together.

      Reply

  34. Frank
    June 13, 2014 @ 11:45 pm

    I was wondering if you know of any Team guys who were really overweight before joining the Navy, lost the weight, and then passed BUD/S? It seems to me that SEALS are typically very athletic guys, but I was just curious.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      June 25, 2014 @ 2:45 pm

      I dont many guys physical condition before BUDS but most of them were in very good shape before passing the PST and better shape right before BUDS. Being overweight was probably not in the equation.

      Reply

  35. Sam
    June 17, 2014 @ 8:46 am

    Brad, I have heard many people say that you should train like you fight. With that being said, while doing workouts should I be wearing my combat boots and pants that are worn at BUDs and Kokoro camp?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      June 19, 2014 @ 8:54 pm

      If your training for Kokoro or BUDS I would do many of the workouts in boots and BDU’s.

      Reply

  36. Andrew
    June 17, 2014 @ 1:34 pm

    Dear Brad,
    Thanks for all the great information and for doing a FAQ. It’s really helpful. To be honest I really want to be a navy seal. I’ve already talked with the recruiter and gotten one of my parents’ signatures (17). The problems I’m having are
    1. I might be color blind
    2. My family is desperate for me to change course.
    I haven’t gotten it certified yet but I am pretty sure I’m colorblind. What can I do if I am??? I’ve tried looking everywhere. In every navy seal book I’ve read the authors say that they trained with other color blind navy seals in buds and that you just have to be determined but how do i do it?? Being a navy seal is a dream. I know it might not realistic with a 60-80% drop out rate but this is what I want to do with my life! I don’t want to be deterred from being a navy seal because of something that I can’t change. Please help me hahaha I’m starting to get desperate. Thank you for your time.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      June 25, 2014 @ 2:37 pm

      Are you talking to a SEAL motivator/recruiter now? They will give you the best updated info.
      good luck.

      Hit me up with an email and I will send you a free audio.

      Reply

    • Dylan Pryor
      June 26, 2014 @ 12:19 am

      Im going through the same thing you are, parents and the color blind thing…… The master chief of nsw said if you do not pass the ishihara plate test then you can take the FALANT lantern test which only mild red-green colordeficent people can pass….. Just remeber you can do all things through christ.

      Reply

  37. Dario
    June 22, 2014 @ 11:15 pm

    Hey brad Im a athlete thats going to be a senior this upcoming year and want to join the Navy in hope of becoming a Seal team member. I was wondering if you could possibly lay out a workout for me. Any tips on how you mentally prepared for it would also be appreciated. I am also a bit unsure of the requirements to qualify for the program so any information you can provide me with would be great.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      June 25, 2014 @ 3:24 pm

      Dario – there are many good tips in the article above.

      Also check out all of our mental tips on the website.

      Hit me up with an email and I will send you a free audio.

      Reply

  38. pax ballesteros
    June 23, 2014 @ 6:15 pm

    Hey brad i was just wondering if you can send me an audio to help me get through BUDS. right now im running 12mins in 2 miles. I just learned CSS 2 weeks ago. Any knowledge will be much appreciated. How many workouts you do in a day and do you meditate too?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      June 25, 2014 @ 1:55 pm

      Good to hear from you Pax – sending you an audio now.

      When I was training for the Navy SEALs I would run or bike to the gym – workout for an hour and then ride back home. On another day I would swim or ruck. I mixed up my workouts alot. I have several other articles on how I trained – just hit me up and I will send them.

      Reply

  39. Byron
    June 30, 2014 @ 9:15 pm

    Hello thanks for all the information. Can you please email me the audio to bhenne90@hotmail.com

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      July 1, 2014 @ 10:56 am

      Byron – just sent the audio. Wanted to make sure you received. Email me Brad “at” sealgrinderpt “dot” com if you don’t receive.

      Reply

  40. Dave
    July 3, 2014 @ 7:00 pm

    Dear Brad,
    Just located your website. It’s great. I have a question about working around injuries at BUD/S, specifically what I refer to as butt rash from doing sit-ups on a hard surface. For example although I have very good core strength and good form, even a relatively small amount of traditional sit-ups on a hard surface causes the skin to rub raw at the top of my butt and tailbone. Are guys at BUD/S allowed to come up with “MacGyver” solutions, like stuffing a small towel down the back of their pants for sit-ups during Grinder PT to minimize this? Or do guys with this relatively common problem just have to suck it up and have bloody underwear for all of their time at BUD/S?

    Thanks in advance,
    Dave

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      July 26, 2014 @ 8:34 pm

      You just have to suck it up.
      it is just like dealing with the cold water swims or log PT… this is not comfort camp.., it is Spartan camp.

      Reply

  41. Bayani Gaboon
    July 20, 2014 @ 6:55 pm

    Yo Brad,

    I’m a Junior in high school, 16 years old, and get a lot of ladies.

    Do you believe I will have enough time to train for BUDs bestowed the conditions of my pt score right now being:

    -I have swam my whole life since i was a sperm, on swim teams
    -about 80 sit ups in 2min
    -60 push ups 2min
    -15 pull ups
    -and I can run a 3.2mile cross-country courses In 16:30-17:30, on a bad day.
    I know a have a lot more work to do, but i don’t know if im good enough. I just need to hear for a from someone that has done that.

    I want to be in prime condition before i even consider facing anyone.

    Thanks and Semper Fidelis man.

    Reply

  42. Sam Waters
    July 21, 2014 @ 5:55 pm

    Brad, when you were preparing for buds was there a specific type of diet that you used? I’ve had a hard time sticking with the paleo diet and was unsure of what else would be good. Thanks.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      July 26, 2014 @ 8:26 pm

      good question Sam.
      i just tried to eat in moderation. I ate at the chow hall every day and had eggs and lean meat for breakfast. I always tried to add in some greens like in a fresh salad. For dinner I ate a lot of carbs and lean meats. No real specific diet other than staying away from junk food.

      Reply

  43. Colt
    August 17, 2014 @ 6:06 pm

    Hey Brad,
    Quick question. How long do you recommend a person who desires to become a seal to train before going to BUD/S or even a recruiter? Like 6 months, years? How long did you train for BUD/S before you went to BUD/S or Basic?
    I am not in Military shape yet, I am a college football player and I want to be smaller before I go to a recruiter. I am great at Calastetics, but not a long endurance athlete at the moment. I am 5’8 200 lbs and muscular, also what weight do you think I should go down to as well before BUD/S?

    Thanks man,
    Colt

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      August 19, 2014 @ 7:42 pm

      It all depends on what your mock PST score is now. If your score sucks then you have a long way to go. If your score rocks then you need to talk to a SEAL motivator/recruiter now.

      Reply

  44. Sam Waters
    August 19, 2014 @ 3:49 pm

    Brad, how were you able to manage preparing for BUDs while you were in college? Were there many late nights and early mornings due to academics and also workouts?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      August 19, 2014 @ 7:41 pm

      A warrior/athletes life will always be hard. Once I decided I was going into the SEAL program I put all efforts into that.

      Reply

  45. Elliot Spears
    August 19, 2014 @ 6:10 pm

    Could you give me a quick rundown of what a typical day looks like in first phase? What should I be expecting that many don’t expect or are aware of?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      August 19, 2014 @ 7:40 pm

      CHeck out the BUDS 234 videos as that is a very accurate depiction of day to day grind in BUDS.

      Reply

  46. Colt
    August 21, 2014 @ 2:13 pm

    Brad,
    What were your PFT scores like before you went to Bud/s?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      August 26, 2014 @ 9:56 pm

      I had average scores going into BUDS.

      Reply

  47. Jared Iannella
    August 23, 2014 @ 12:08 pm

    Hey Mr. McLeod!! So my dream is to become a Navy SEAL. So last year I graduated 8th grade and 2 months ago graduated 9th grade. During the middle of 9th grade I realized my weight was skyrocketing (197lbs) and I had to get it under control. I had lost 49lbs in about 4 months to pursuit my dream( Keep in mind im 15, 148lbs and about 6 feet tall) You had said in your video “How to train for Navy SEAL BUD/S( Learn from my mistakes)” that you failed a math test and went to the fleet. Here is my question. Did you do running for BUD/S on a treadmill while you where on that ship, and if so was it like soft sand? Thanks and your workouts are killer!!!

    Reply

  48. David
    August 24, 2014 @ 10:41 pm

    I want to ask you about weight and healthy diet plans just to stay in shape or gain some weight to turn into muscle while staying healthy. Do you recommend anything pertaining to that subject/question?

    Also this is more of a personal question but how much did you weigh when you first entered BUD/S and did your weight increase, decrease, or stay the same the second time?

    I also purchased a weighted vest to use it for my push-ups, pull-ups, dips, and some runs. Do you recommend me doing anything else with it or anything I shouldn’t be doing with it?

    Also thank you for the workouts you post on the website and how much you help people the people who are interested in going into the SEALs community and want to prepare themselves more before they enter BUD/S!

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      August 26, 2014 @ 10:01 pm

      i weighed 170 lbs at 5 ft 8 inches going into BUDS.

      I would take a mock PST and find out weakness and focus on building up those. Retest monthly.

      Reply

  49. Matt
    August 24, 2014 @ 10:49 pm

    This might be a dumb question for most people but do u get to drink coffee in BUD/S? And if so how often? Coffee is my staple drink besides water! Thanks

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      August 25, 2014 @ 3:30 pm

      Yes; there is all the coffee you can drink at the BUDS chow hall.
      thanks for posting Matt.
      hit me with an email and I will send you a free audio.

      Reply

  50. Aaron Cowan
    August 25, 2014 @ 10:11 am

    Hello SEAL Grinder PT Team,
    My name is Aaron Cowan, I recently graduated high school and now am starting my first day of college classes. I will only be in school for a couple months as I am working to be a Personal Care Assistant but I dream of one day serving my country with the elites of the military world, which in my mind is the Navy SEALs. So I have two questions: 1) How do I start training over the next year to prepare for a Navy life and hopefully (and eventually) the Navy SEALs? 2) What is the best military watch I can buy at a reasonable price?
    I appreciate you taking the time to answer this.
    Thank you.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      August 26, 2014 @ 10:05 pm

      Check out the tips above and start in on the workouts. Casio G Shock is best value. If you lose it – get another.

      Reply

  51. Jared
    August 26, 2014 @ 9:51 am

    This may also sound dumb but while you were in the fleet did you do your running on a treadmill? I own a gym membership and was curious if I could do my running on a treadmill. Im 15 so when I become a senior I would enlist into the navy.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      August 26, 2014 @ 12:01 pm

      I ran stairs on the ship and did walking lunges.
      Running on a tread mill is a waste of time if your training to be a SEAL.
      You need to be running outside on trails and through creeks and around lakes – a beach if you can.
      Hit me with an email and I will send you a free audio.

      Reply

  52. Jax
    August 28, 2014 @ 1:47 am

    Do you know anything about the C-SORT? I was hoping there would be more details about the test as I am aware it is a personality test. I’m also interested in your audio tape. I’m 18 and currently talking to a recruiter and being mentored by my dad (10th special forces).

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      September 17, 2014 @ 2:52 pm

      Talk to a Special Forces recruiter or SEAL motivator.

      Email brad “at” sealgrinderpt “dot” com and I will send you a free motivational audio.

      Reply

  53. Haaris Bjotvedt
    August 28, 2014 @ 11:26 am

    Hi my name is Haaris Bjotvedt. I live in Phoenix Arizona and I am 16. I have wanted to be a navy seal since freshman year in high school after I watched the Bud/s training videos. I am now currently a sophmore and have been training my self over the two years. I really wanted to talk to a former Navy Seal about my goal so I could have a better chance at succeeding at Bud/s.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      September 1, 2014 @ 12:52 pm

      Great to hear from you Haaris. Please check out the tips and workouts above.
      Hit me up with an email and I will send you a free motivational audio.

      Reply

  54. Todd Hatfield
    September 7, 2014 @ 6:01 pm

    Hey Brad,

    You probably get this question a lot but I was wondering, does size matter in BUD/S? I am not a big guy. Only 5’5″ and about 140, on a good day. For the physical screening test I have all competitive scores so fitness is not an issue. I mostly do body weight exercises including your Grinder Strength pull up program. Should I be doing more weight training to get bigger or does size really not matter in BUD/S? I am a little concerned that if I start weight lifting it would hurt my scores.

    Todd

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      September 9, 2014 @ 8:12 pm

      Todd: if you are weak then you should do some weight lifting. If you are already strong then I would do bodyweight workouts only. Most SEALs are about 5 ft 8 to 5 ft 10 inches. BUDS favors smaller leaner guys. Best of luck.

      Reply

      • Todd Hatfield
        September 10, 2014 @ 7:41 am

        Thanks for answering Brad. I’ll stick to the body weight workouts.

        Reply

        • Brad McLeod
          September 15, 2014 @ 3:40 pm

          Good to hear from you Todd

          Email brad “at” sealgrinderpt.com and I will send you a free motivational audio.

          Reply

  55. Sam Waters
    September 17, 2014 @ 12:32 pm

    Brad, I have been looking into doing martial arts on top of my training regiment to help prepare myself for BUDs. Is there a specific type that you would recommend for someone wanting to become a SEAL? Thanks.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      September 17, 2014 @ 2:47 pm

      I would focus first on getting a great PST score and a contract. Leave the martial arts for when you get to the SEAL Teams.

      Reply

  56. Antonio Hernandez
    September 19, 2014 @ 6:36 pm

    First of all, Mr.Mcleod, I’d like to thank you for serving our country. I’m an aspiring Navy SEAL. I’ve looked on the Navy SEAL’s website and have been doing the workouts they recommend and have been doing them as much as I can. I’m absolutely committed to becoming a part of the Navy SEALs. I was wondering; however, on what else I could do to prepare myself for being admitted into a BUD/S class. If you could give me some advice, I’d love it. Thank you once again, and hope to hear from you soon.

    P.S. I am also wondering on what qualities makes a great commissioned officer, since you have had personal experience with officers. I plan to be in NROTC next year, as I am a high school senior this year.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      September 23, 2014 @ 2:28 pm

      Good to hear from you Antonio. Start talking now to a SEAL motivator – working out with a group under the SEAL motivators over site and finding out more about Officer training. Also get an appointment with the NROTC and talk with them.
      Email me and I will send you a free motivational audio.

      Reply

  57. Vijay
    September 22, 2014 @ 4:15 pm

    Good evening, Sir. I have heard a lot of comments on several videos/ interviews about how to handle pain, cold/ lack of sleep / being uncomfortable for several days, etc. specifically through hell week. From what I remember, the biggest advice I’ve got is that you cannot prepare for such things and that the only spot you will really know if you are capable to deal with it is there, with the rest of your team.
    Is there any other way one could prepare for some of those struggles?
    Thank you.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      September 23, 2014 @ 2:22 pm

      Vijay:
      Good to hear from you. Try the workouts listed in the article and get out and do a Spartan Race, GoRuck event or 20X Challenge to prepare yourself more physically and mentally.

      Reply

  58. Lenexx M
    October 17, 2014 @ 5:05 pm

    Hey Brad, I’m currently a junior in high school and after i graduate I would like to try to be a SEAL. I’m an avid wrestler so the base for something like BUD/S is there, but my question is what is the best way you think to take on BUD/S. Right now I have above minimum PST scores so after high school I could probably have them in the optimum range, so I’m thinking about taking on BUD/S right after high school. I read that almost all SEALs now have degrees so is going to college first a better idea, or my family kind of has a tradition with the marines so maybe doing a term in the corps and trying to join the SEALs as prior service. What do you think is the best route thanks in advance.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      October 17, 2014 @ 8:36 pm

      For me it was best to go into the Navy and try the SEAL program at a young age and do college later. I should have tried to finish high school early and go in the Navy at 17 or 18.

      For some it may be to go to College first. Each person is different so that will be an individual choice.

      Reply

  59. Jack
    October 21, 2014 @ 10:05 pm

    Coach,

    I am subscribed to your emails and look forward to them everyday. Thank you so much for taking time to send them and motivate.

    I am training for BUD/S and had a question for you. Do you think it would be more beneficial to:
    1. limit breaks when trying to reach high rep exercises that will eventually lead to failure but higher muscle fatigue
    or
    2. do a steady number of said exercises throughout the day that would lead to more total reps

    Please let me know your thoughts on which method would be a better preparer for BUD/S.

    Thank you

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      January 8, 2015 @ 10:32 pm

      I would not train till failure. I would train with mock PST style workouts (mix it up with variety) and do a mock PST every 2 weeks.

      Reply

  60. Daniel
    December 3, 2014 @ 10:38 am

    Hi Stew,
    My name is Daniel, Im 17 years old, and have aspired to be a SEAL for years now. I have a running backround and recently started training for triathlons. I had a few questions on BUDS. First, how much swimming in involved compared to running? I’m an ok swimmer but haven’t trained much for it and was wondering how important it is to go to BUDS swim fit? Will I be doing just as much swimming as running? Second is, how much calisthenics should I be doing? Should I be able to pump out thousands of pushups and dips everyday? Would you recommend training in such high repetitions? If not what would you recommend? Lastly is do you believe that camps based on Navy SEAL training are legit? I’m referring to the fitness part of BUDS and mental toughness type. Not the pretending to be a SEAL type. Any advice would be greatly appreciated, Thanks.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      December 11, 2014 @ 4:55 pm

      Daniel – I would talk with your SEAL motivator and take a mock PST to see how your swimming stacks up against other recruits.

      You may find that you need to work on swimming and pull ups.

      I would then work on your weaknesses with the group of other candidates that the motivator is working with.

      We like SEALFIT Kokoro, 20X Challenge and GoRuck to help prepare you for BUDS. We have written several articles on this.. use the search tab in the upper right of the website.

      email me brad “at” sealgrinderpt.com and I will send you a free motivational audio

      Reply

  61. ulysee davis
    December 24, 2014 @ 1:13 pm

    1. What is the schedule for BUDS, or how much time do you have to prepare for the next day?

    2.What do the seal candidates do in spare time during BUDS

    3. Are you allowed to have healing products at BUDs? (not pills) but maybe an pocket sized stem machine? Because that’s really good for sore muscles. And also chaff bam?

    4. Will 40lbs replace a ruck pack on my ruck runs?

    5. I’m a pretty good runner, I average about 30miles a week (treadmill, knee hasn’t heal yet, will move to sand later on) a week do I need to do more?

    6. I have tattoo on my chest and arms, will this hurt my chances at the Navy BUDS training?

    7.Does shaving waivers matter in BUDs or u shave no matter what?

    8.Ok I average about 15:20 on the 500yd swim, how can I get that number down to be more competitive? I live in Maryland so if there are any instructor near I would like to have their info so they could coach me up

    9.Will running with an elevation mask increase my stamina to swim long and faster?

    10.Not much of a swimmer, what can I do to increase that confidence and skill?

    11.Is there any time between evolutions? i.e water, stretch, ect…

    12.Are there any little small survivor tips to know about BUDs? Laundry (I watch class 234, how many pairs of uniforms do you guys have) How do you wash clothes, is cleaning equipment hard or timely, are you given a wakeup call or you set your own clock?

    13.What do most guys do on the weekend of the first phase? Are you allowed to get massages or therapy to heal from the brutal ass kicking?

    14.Are you allowed to have Gatorade in you sleeping quarters?

    15.Will there be pain? lol

    16.At Pre BUDs do the instructors do a good job teaching swimming technique? I hear they can take someone who’s never been in water and get them to pass the PST, is this true?

    17.How is Navy boot camp for BUDs contracted canidates? Are we all group together or are we just among the other members of the class?

    Reply

  62. Ryan
    January 11, 2015 @ 10:45 am

    Good morning Brad,
    Recently I have become very interested in becoming a SEAL. I am 22 years old and have been lacking with my workouts.

    I am very serious about training to be a SEAL and am looking for guidance,this is why I am here, I also have a few questions I hope you can answer.

    First off I am not a strong swimmer,but I am going to start getting into the pool roughly 3 times a week.

    Anyways here are my questions:

    1. How hard is it to get a BUD/S contract?

    2.I have tried to join a military branch back in 2010 and was Temporarily DQ’ed for “may benefit from an inhaler”. Which one out of 4 doctors wrote. All others say I am good. ( Just wondering how long MEPS keeps records of TDQ’ed)

    3. Now, if its possible to enlist in the Navy and go to BUD/S after question #2, Should I proceed with the plan of take a year or so to train before enlisting?

    My dream is to serve my country!

    Thanks for your service and information.

    If you could please contact me at my email,I have many more questions,but if #2 makes this impossible for me then all my questions will be pointless.

    Reply

  63. Ben
    February 2, 2015 @ 8:53 pm

    Hello sir,
    Thank you for your service, I was wondering several things. If I had to take an anti depressant for a period of time due to depression while figuring out I had sleep apnea because of throat and nose issues but am off of it in the near future will I be disqualified if I go for buds years down the road.
    And you said in the article with the mind to have a strong “why” I was wondering what was your why to have an example of what you mean.
    Thank you again.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      February 2, 2015 @ 9:15 pm

      Ben; thanks for posting. Are you talking to a SEAL motivator now? If not contact your local SEAL motivator. Use google and check online.

      Reply

      • Ben
        February 3, 2015 @ 12:28 am

        No sir, I have not. I thought this was information I needed to know before contacting them. But thank you for taking the time to write your email and website have been very helpful.

        Reply

  64. Jordan S
    February 17, 2015 @ 10:51 pm

    Coach, what happens if you get pneumonia at BUD/S? Are you rolled back like a broken bone injury or dropped?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      February 18, 2015 @ 11:41 pm

      for medical you get rolled back. But i would not worry about that.. Think about getting a contract to get in to start.

      Reply

  65. shawn c.
    March 21, 2015 @ 2:21 pm

    Hey, I’ve got a question for you. When should I start cutting down on sleep to adjust for bud/s ? I leave for boot camp mid July.
    Thanks

    Reply

  66. lrc_1
    April 5, 2015 @ 11:05 pm

    If I am not a U.S. citizen can I enter to the navy and then apply to BUD/S. I am Colombian an since I was a kid I always wanted to be a SEAL. If yes what do you recommend to me?
    Also I have another question if I am small I am 170cm how difficult is to me to pass BUD/S?
    Thank you I respect you a lot.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      April 6, 2015 @ 2:10 pm

      Lucas: talk to a Navy SEAL recruiter on your citizenship stuff. Try the workouts that are listed on this page and post up your scores in comments.

      Reply

  67. Cody
    April 15, 2015 @ 9:57 pm

    How often were your conditioning runs a week and what was the mileage?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      April 16, 2015 @ 7:06 pm

      At least 2 to 3 times a week and about 4 to 6 miles in the sand.

      Reply

  68. Ben
    April 18, 2015 @ 6:13 am

    Coach what are some tips for not letting the instructors get in your head mentally?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      April 19, 2015 @ 1:29 pm

      good question Ben.
      I would go to a camp that will put you in that same position (SEALFIT, GORUCK, Don Shipley) for conditioning.

      Build your “why”. If your why is strong enough it can overcome any how.

      Reply

  69. Fisher
    April 21, 2015 @ 11:12 pm

    As someone who has gone through the pipeline and served, what can I do to give myself the biggest chance of success I can? I don’t want o go in knowing I could’ve prepared a different way or trained my mind better or missed an opportunity to better myself.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      April 22, 2015 @ 10:16 am

      Fisher – find out what your weakness is and improve it.

      Reply

  70. Brad Consigny
    May 1, 2015 @ 10:34 am

    Hey Coach!

    My name is also Brad. I am 18 years old, and have been a sprint runner, long distance runner, and intense swimmer in my day. I just have a few questions regarding training for BUD/S. I have never shot a gun before, so should I learn how to shoot before hand? I also heard that during hell week we have to run over 200 miles. Is that 40 consecutive miles everyday? Or is it divided throughout the day? Should I try and run 200 miles one week before hell week, along with staying awake for 5 and a half days? And how should I go about preparing for log pt? Thanks so much for your help and quick responses.

    -Brad

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      May 1, 2015 @ 11:09 am

      i would not advise running 200 miles in a week – unless you slowly build up to it and are a running beast (David Goggins). I would advise you to do a SEALFIT 20X, GORUCK or Kokoro and do tough workout challenges and stay up all night. Read more of the tips in the article and hit me up with any questions.

      Reply

  71. Morgen Redd
    May 3, 2015 @ 2:18 am

    Hey Mr. McLeod,

    First off, thanks for taking the time to put together all these tips, answer questions, and for your service. I’m 15 right now, I play hockey pretty competitively (going to boarding school next year to play and train) so I’m really athletic. I’ve wanted to be a SEAL for a couple of years now. Should I be doing extra workouts each summer, and if so, what would you recommend for me?

    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      May 3, 2015 @ 8:22 pm

      Do the daily workouts that we are currently posting at sealgrinderpt.com — post your score in comments – lets see how you do.

      Reply

  72. Graham
    May 12, 2015 @ 11:54 pm

    Mr. McLeod:

    Thank you for running such a great website! I purchased your Grinder Strength Pullups ebook and it has definitely helped me to increase my pullups. I refer my friends to your site all the time.

    If it’s not too much trouble, I have a few questions about Navy SEAL teams. What is the lowest rank a member can be? I think I read somewhere at the completion of BUD/S or SQT, lower ranking guys are automatically promoted to a certain rank. Is this true?

    Also, is the culture (and by culture I guess I mean hierarchy dynamics and the way members treat each other) like that of an Army or Marine infantry platoon where NCOs who are higher ranking and more experienced tell the lower ranking guys what to do? Or are the Teams more egalitarian as each member is seen as an “operator” that doesn’t necessarily need to be constantly supervised/lead.

    I’m particularly interested in the contrast between the Ranger Regiment and the Teams. From my limited understanding, it seems like Privates in the Ranger Battalions are treated like Privates should be until they prove themselves/go to Ranger School. Do new guys in the Teams have pretty much the same experience or are they seen as being more of “one of us now” once they get to the Teams? How about after SQT?

    Thank you for your time.

    Graham Boulton

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      May 13, 2015 @ 12:58 pm

      in the Teams you have lower ranked guys that have a lot of responsibility and some say in operations. It is not completely a flat structure as the Officer in charge has final say — but there is less hierarchy than the Army.

      Reply

  73. chris
    May 18, 2015 @ 6:08 pm

    I completed a 50m underwater swim and understand the danger of it now. My body went into a state to be able to pass the exercise but I knew it was only headed toward a blackout. A good ace up the sleeve but something I wouldn’t try again. My question is how difficult is it to do when you add the front flip. I didn’t do it this way and was wondering how to prevent water from coming up your nose and not losing breat?

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      May 18, 2015 @ 8:50 pm

      practice the jump in with no push off and swim underwater. I would personally not practice breath holding unless you have a full lifeguard on the edge of the pool watching you and a swim buddy in the pool with you. It is not worth it.

      Reply

  74. chris
    May 19, 2015 @ 9:47 am

    Is BUD/S fair? Will they take into account your character/toughness if you mess up on something silly. And vice versa, kick you out bc you are a total jerk even if you’re deep into the training.

    Reply

    • Brad McLeod
      May 19, 2015 @ 11:25 am

      No BUDS is not fair. It is like the NFL — if you fumble you get put on the bench. If you fumble again you lose your spot. Life is not fair.

      Reply

      • chris
        May 19, 2015 @ 12:50 pm

        How bad do you have to mess up or stick out for that to be an issue? I just want to do what I’m told and work hard with my crew. I don’t want it to be another popularity contest like high school where the good guys get screwed

        Reply

        • chris
          May 19, 2015 @ 2:56 pm

          How much can you control is my question? If you don’t quit and do what you’re told is there anything else that could sucker punch you? I just don’t want to miss out bc of something I didn’t prep for.

          Reply

          • Brad McLeod
            May 19, 2015 @ 10:34 pm

            You can only control what is between your ears. Have you done a GORUCK, Spartan Race or 20X Challenge? I would start with those and begin your journey.

        • Brad McLeod
          May 19, 2015 @ 10:38 pm

          Don’t over think it… you just have to prepare and do it. Have you done a GORUCK, 20X Challenge or Spartan Race? I would start with those.

          Reply

  75. Van Allen James
    July 31, 2015 @ 10:03 pm

    Hello Mr. McLeod.
    I’m 23 and am preparing myself to become a seal, I’ve got an iron will to pass all that is thrown at me. I mainly care about injury prevention and endurance. My question is what type of boots would you suggest getting to start becoming accustom to running on the sand(soft&hard) during BUD/S?

    Reply

  76. Conner Luster
    September 6, 2015 @ 9:19 pm

    Hi Brad
    I left this question here before but I couldn’t find it to see if it was answered, I went to Buds and made it to hell week before ringing out. I had a lot of trouble running with a boat on my head, even though I was one of the strongest guys in my class it still bugs me till this day. Do you have any suggestions? My head bounces up and down a lot when I run and I need to fix that…Can you give me the contact information to someone that can help me if you can’t? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Brad
      September 7, 2015 @ 8:47 pm

      i would train with a sand bag on my shoulder (not on your head) in the sand. Run a ton in the sand.

      part of it is your mind. If you don’t mind — it don’t matter. All of the other guys are carrying that boat also.

      my point — is that what was hard for you “boat on head” — was easy for others. But probably they had other things that were hard for them like being in the cold water. But they persevered… more than likely not by training to get in cold water — but more by not letting the cold water get to their mind and effect them.

      that make sense?

      Reply

  77. Steven
    November 2, 2015 @ 12:20 am

    Love your grinder PT videos on YouTube. My question to you is: why is running done after resistance exercise? Wouldn’t it be better to use the run as a good warm up in order to do PT after and reduce the risk of injuries when running after a grueling PT session?
    Thanks for your service! You are an inspiration.

    Reply

    • Brad
      November 2, 2015 @ 1:23 pm

      a lot of times we have running as part of the exercise.

      Reply

  78. Nik
    November 5, 2015 @ 10:21 pm

    Hello, Sir

    I’d first like to say thank you for your service to our country.

    My name is Nik and it has been my dream, ever since 8th grade, to become a Navy SEAL. I have a question about how you would best handle the situation I’m in. I’m a freshman in college and I am studying electrical engineering. I bought a SEAL workout book and I have been struggling to find time to find time to do any PT. I try to run and swim occasionally, but I notice myself staying up really late doing homework. Do you have any suggestions on how I can make this work?

    One more question:
    How can I heighten my chances of getting into BUD/s out of officer candidate schools? I want to be as competitive as possible. I plan on joining wrestling next year, but is there anything other than a sport that will allow me to be more competitive in the selection process?

    V/r
    Nik Untalan

    Reply

    • Brad
      November 9, 2015 @ 12:14 pm

      follow the tips and workouts posted above. Focus on wrestling as that is a good choice to help you get ready for BUDS.

      Reply

  79. Garrett
    November 16, 2015 @ 12:10 pm

    I don’t really know much about bicycles but it’s there one you would recommend that would be good for trails and regular riding?

    Reply

    • Brad
      November 16, 2015 @ 10:07 pm

      i just had a $200 used 10 speed that i used – nothing fancy — i just made it work.

      Reply

  80. Starr Toler
    December 8, 2015 @ 8:23 pm

    My name is Starr Toler and i just have a quick question; well request. My boyfriend, Dalton Clowers, wants to become a navy seal officer. I really want to support him in that so i wanted to get him something related to that for Christmas. I was wondering if y’all had any posters or anything and if some officer or trainees could sign a book or poster and give words of advice and/or support for him that would be great. or if there is a way to buy one f before Christmas with an autograph to him. If you could get back to me that would be greatly appreciated!!! Thanks for your time!

    Starr Toler

    Reply

    • Brad
      December 9, 2015 @ 1:35 pm

      Starr: send me your address to brad@sealgrinderpt.com and I will send you a bone frog hat that he will like.
      thanks

      Reply

  81. Mason
    December 16, 2015 @ 11:43 am

    My name is Mason Putnam I’m a senior in high school and was looking at either SEALs or possibly EOD. What is a good way to train? I was doing more land and weight training because I was more focused on Rangers, but that was before I was Disqualified from the Army for medical reasons. But I’m dead set on going special operations and now just have more incentive to go and either come home successful or in a box. But the point is I was wondering what a good regimen to prepare for BUD/S. I know someone that was either Force Recon or MARSOC (I can’t remember), if he trained me could his workouts help come time for BUD/S? Thank you

    Reply

    • Brad
      December 16, 2015 @ 9:39 pm

      Mason: follow the daily workouts that we post up. Post your scores in comments so we can see them and be held accountable.

      Reply

  82. Jaden
    January 30, 2016 @ 8:55 pm

    Thank you for the information it has been extremely helpful for my preparation. I do have a few questions however and I apologize if I’ve overlooked where they have already been answered.
    I’m currently a firefighter/EMT, while finishing my bachelors degree. I’ve been able to work my way up the ladder here at the FD and am confident in my resume. I’m considering commissioning to be an officer for SEALS if I am given the opportunity. I’m aware of the competitive nature for being selected. My question is what qualities outside of academics, and extra curricula’s do they look for in an officer candidate for the SEAL teams? I have 1 year left to finish my degree and was wondering when in my progress would be a good time to begin the process with the local recruiters?
    I used to be an ocean lifeguard and am confident in my swimming ability for long distances in the ocean. What I lack however is the running technique for long distances, aside from the obvious cardio levels. Any tips on form or technique for building long distance runs?
    Thank you for the information and I look forward to your response.

    Reply

  83. Markus
    March 26, 2017 @ 5:33 pm

    Hey I have a question how did you get used to doing sit-ups and stuff like that on the grinder with no patting and what are some things I can do to get used to that . Also what is grinder appreciation

    Reply

    • Brad
      March 26, 2017 @ 8:44 pm

      you will need to do some sit-ups on concrete now to toughen up your tail bone. I have not heard of “grinder appreciation”. I have heard of wetsuit appreciation where you have to swim in cold water to earn your wetsuit.

      Reply

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